Forum for Transnational Collaboration in the Visual Arts | November 17 & 18

By: Melissa Vonimary Sovik, MAIS ’18

On November 17 & 18, we are organizing the Forum for Transnational Collaboration in the Visual Arts with the objective of bringing together emerging voices from previously marginalized countries that are poised to become an essential part of the global conversation in contemporary art and institutions today. What traditionally used to be the art capitals of the world seems to be changing alongside a major shift in the world economy. We wish to create conversation on these topics and hope that it will promote a network of engagement among arts professionals.

As a student in the 21st century, I find the topic of globalization perhaps more relevant than ever. My generation is constantly exposed to the effects of globalization, whether positive or negative. I believe it is important to get a deeper understanding of its scope and its implications; globalization touches other aspects of society as well. In order to be able to address the issues of globalization, a comprehensive understanding of the phenomenon is essential.

Prior to reading John Zarobell´s book “Arts and the Global Economy”, I had little knowledge of the art industry. It had actually never crossed my mind how the industry alone contributes to billions in the world economy each year. For some countries, it often represents a larger share of its GDP than other sectors, such as tourism and transportation. Besides the jobs directly linked to the production, selling and exhibition of arts, one has to take into consideration the creating of jobs indirectly linked to the arts and creative industry, whether it is in the infrastructure, management or real estate. This opened my eyes to a whole new dimension in the art world. The little economist inside me was left impressed.

There is no doubt that the globalization is deeply interconnected with the arts. As John Zarobell writes in his book: “This is also globalization: not simply the products and lifestyles marketed by multinational corporations, but the way in which consciousness is engaged in making sense of expressions of transnational experience”.

Dhaka Art Summit 2015
Dhaka Art Summit 2015

In this symposium, nine participants will discuss the emergent character of their own artistic domains and enter into conversation with one another. We count on participants from cities like Johannesburg, Mexico City, and Hong Kong. They will be divided into three panels taking place Friday and Saturday. Following the final panel, there will be a tour of the Mission District and a performance at Incline Gallery, a local non-profit art space. Some of the topics that will be discussed include the overlapping circuits of production and consumption in the art world, the dynamic relationship between culture and political liberalization, gentrification and cultural districts, government support of or intervention in the arts, the informal economy of the arts, and global art brands.

I encourage you to attend this symposium as I believe it will lead to a deeper understanding of globalization and I have no doubt it will be highly beneficial to graduate and undergraduate students from USF.

I invite you to take a look at our webpage as well as Facebook page for more information about the event.

To register for the event: https://rsvp.usfca.edu/events/forum-for-transnational-collaboration-in-the-visual-arts/event-summary-ccf1ffc4f5624daaaa5bb022e0d4fd50.aspx

Advertisements

Dhaka Art Summit

Dhaka Bangladesh, February 4-8, 2016 | Professor John Zarobell

Art ought to be a means to overturn such expectations and to allow people to understand history and its relation to the present in a new way.

Last week, I traveled to Bangladesh to attend a unique visual arts event, the Dhaka Arts Summit. This was the third manifestation of a biennial festival that began in 2012 and I participated in the festival by moderating a large panel of curators and artists discussing the development of regional group exhibitions. Regional group exhibitions are controversial among artists and curators in the Global South because, while including them in a broader expanded understanding of modern and contemporary art, these museum shows nevertheless position them in the role of an exotic other for a western audience. Since the Dhaka Art Summit is itself a regional group show, billing itself as the largest festival of South Asian Art, it is clear that these projects have evolved since the 1980s, when the first exhibitions of non-western artists began to appear in European and American museums. Having a regional show take place in the region and unaffiliated with any museum, means that the terms are now more open to debate.

Festival Director announcing awards

Continue reading “Dhaka Art Summit”